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Thread: Please take a look at this Nadir patch

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MetroRuss

Posts: 58
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Registered: 6 Mar 2013
Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 3 May 2013 at 23:19 GMT
Hi,

I am hoping someone could take a look at this N1 and N2. I have tried it a few times and cannot get the one tripod foot patch to blend in. Please have a look at my masks on N1 and N2 and let me know if you think it is correct. I have a feeling that when I move the tripod the DPD distance ( I moved mine a little bit more in this pano series.)

ge.tt/7FLp7jf?c files are in tiff

Appreciate your assistance.
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 4 May 2013 at 1:38 GMT
MetroRuss,

You have a couple of issues that are keeping this panorama from being an easy stitch.

Your rig is not calibrated. Take a look at the rail over the water. Compare the location of leaves in the water to the rail in a different view. You will see that the background shifts in relationship to the handrail. For panoramas so very close to a handrail like this, your calibration must be spot on or you will be fighting an uphill battle. Some of the more experienced stitchers here may get a good stitch. Why make it harder than it has to be? Run through your calibration steps until all parallax is gone.

As to masking, you did not pay attention to your shadow. You would have had to move your tripod so very far over in order to get a shot of the deck where your camera shadow is.

When you have a nice sunny day and shadows like this, rotate your tripod so two of the tripod legs cast the same shadow. The way you set your tripod down you have 3 shadows. You can eliminate one by rotating your rig until you have only 2.

Even with the Nadir adapter or any other technique you need to capture enough shadow free areas in order to mask away all shadows. A hand held Nadir shot might help here. I might have ended up taking at least 3 additional shot while rotating my rig around just to make sure I have enough shadow free shots. You might end up with at least one shot where you are offset at an angle in order to not have the camera shadow in the finished panorama.

With this type of wooden deck you probably could remove the shadow in post production with Photoshop. Make liberal use of cloning and healing. Content Aware Fill is my friend. Remember that you are creating an illusion not documenting a scene.

I hope this helps instead of confuses.

Dennis
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MetroRuss

Posts: 58
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Registered: 6 Mar 2013
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 4 May 2013 at 5:51 GMT
Hi Dennis,

Thanks for your help smile

Please have a look at my alignment thanks to your tutorial wink
360smb.com/dennis/build.swf


I followed Johns tute in regards to NNP and spent a long time adjusting back and forth but couldnt nail it. I will try it again tomorrow morning, going to head back out to the park and get some more test panos.

Have a great day!!
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John Houghton

Posts: 3934
Location: Hitchin, United Kingdom
Registered: 17 Jan 2005
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 4 May 2013 at 7:47 GMT
Russ, The nadir shots you supplied are in landscape orientation and should be rotated with Photoshop into the same orientation as the others (looks like it needs to be 90 degrees clockwise rather than counterclockwise). Do turn off the auto rotate option in the camera so that all the images are automatically in the same orientation for PTGui. When masking the viewpoint nadir shot(s), mask out everything not part of the plane of the floor/ground. Either tilt the horizontal row of shots down a little, or shoot two down shots instead of just one, rotating the head by 90 or 180 degrees of yaw between them. This will ensure complete coverage up to the legs of the tripod. Note where the shadow of the tripod and camera falls. Outdoors in good light you can take a viewpoint nadir shot with the camera off the tripod (now shifted out of the way), holding the camera such that you now capture the tripod area without shadows. (Take care that new shadows of you and the camera don't overlap the previous shadows). Apart from that, the subject is difficult to stitch perfectly because a large proportion of the scene is subject to movement (tree branches and foliage, clouds, and water). Nevertheless, it's possible to get a decent stitch, albeit with some gaps, as in your result.

John
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MetroRuss

Posts: 58
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Registered: 6 Mar 2013
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 7 May 2013 at 16:21 GMT
Hi Dennis and John,

smile success!!

Finally figured it out after reading and following along with your awesome advice and tutes.

Thank you very much!!
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 7 May 2013 at 16:48 GMT
Please publish your results. I would like to see the completed pano.
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MetroRuss

Posts: 58
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Registered: 6 Mar 2013
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 0:14 GMT
Hi Dennis,
I will post a link shortly. I've got to ptp them still.

Can I ask you about taking some real estate panos in a house. What would be an ideal time of day and what aperture would one use. If I have learned anything this past month I am thinking smaller will be better.

Would I want the sun blasting through windows or more of a balanced early evening light.

Have a great evening.
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 0:41 GMT
Take your pictures early in the morning or late in the afternoon. I am not sure exactly when the "Golden Hour" is. During that time the sun is a golden color and NOT BLASTING in through the windows. You do not want blown windows. Real estate is just not my "thing".

There are way too many tips on the internet for real estate photography. Do a search and you will find much more information than I am able to write here.

Still anxiously waiting on your pano...
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MetroRuss

Posts: 58
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Registered: 6 Mar 2013
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 7:59 GMT
Hi Dennis,

Sorry for the delay. 360smb.com/dennis/ I have been calibrating my NN4 and rokfish all damn night. It seems that the lens is a little loose fitting and it moves a little, well enough to not be centered on the nodal ninja logo on top of the axis.



Thanks for the tips
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hindenhaag

Posts: 901
Location: Netherlands
Registered: 7 Mar 2010
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 9:06 GMT
Hi,

The rotator shows teeth cutting to the right. This says you should move your camera to the right on lower rail.

Heinz
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MetroRuss

Posts: 58
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Registered: 6 Mar 2013
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 16:06 GMT
Hi Heinz,

Thanks for the tip. As well, your tutes on nn forum were very helpful. Thank you
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John Houghton

Posts: 3934
Location: Hitchin, United Kingdom
Registered: 17 Jan 2005
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 16:36 GMT
Russ, There's not a lot wrong with the setup of your head according to the nadir image. However, I'm a little concerned about the stitching errors in the floor. It's possible that the saw tooth errors in the panohead may be in part due to the stitching. Can you make the camera images available so the stitching can be investigated? I noticed some stitching errors in the spherical panoramas you posted, but I doubt that the head setup had anything to do with those.

John
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 16:41 GMT
What concerns me is that the saw teeth do not look like they are the same size. This tells me that your rig is not as stable as it could be. Maybe my poor old eyes are just seeing things.

After moving the lower rail setting to the proper place, the saw teeth should completely disappear. Saw to the right, move to the right. Saw to the left, move to the left. You may not completely eliminate the saw teeth. Just get as close as you can. If you can get within 1mm you will be fine. Don't worry about trying to dial in a .5 mm adjustment.

The next step is to move back and forth until your rotator appears round. If it has points, move back. If it looks like a flower, move forward. Kind of a pain but once you get it your stitching will go much easier.

If, after doing all of this, you point your camera straight down and see that the center of the rotator is not centered in the screen, do not worry. You are not optimizing for this view but rather optimizing for a good stitch. Don't move your lower rail setting just to get the rotator in the center of the screen. You will just mess things up.
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burake

Posts: 336
Location: Antalya, Turkey
Registered: 7 Jun 2012
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 8 May 2013 at 21:00 GMT

DennisS said:

If, after doing all of this, you point your camera straight down and see that the center of the rotator is not centered in the screen, do not worry. You are not optimizing for this view but rather optimizing for a good stitch. Don't move your lower rail setting just to get the rotator in the center of the screen. You will just mess things up.


So true! I've been assuming that the center of the camera has to be centered with the rotator and shooting for a long time like that! And my stitching results were not so good I discovered later!

Burak
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vrbali

Posts: 197
Location: Bali, Indonesia
Registered: 12 Feb 2010
Re: Please take a look at this Nadir patch
Posted: 9 May 2013 at 6:09 GMT

MetroRuss said:

If I have learned anything this past month I am thinking smaller will be better.


Closing down the aperture will make Depth Of Field larger, but at very small apertures, you will lose sharpness due to diffraction. So it is best to find the sharpest aperture of your lens with sufficient depth of field for your scene and closest subject you want to have sharp. With my Sigma 8mm (fisheye) on Nikon D300, I go never smaller then f/8. dofmaster.com/dofjs.html can help you to give an estimate.

MetroRuss said:

Would I want the sun blasting through windows or more of a balanced early evening light.

Go for the hour(s) before sunset, it makes processing the images a lot easier. However, when the sun shines straight through the window around sunset, you could go for the early morning.

Hope this helps.

VRBali
www.virtualvisitbali.com
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