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Octavias

Posts: 33
Location: Brooklyn, United States
Registered: 31 Jan 2013
Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 31 Jan 2013 at 16:13 GMT
Hey Gang!

My name is Max and I am a co-founder of ACMB Photography. We specialize in Virtual tour, interior and food photography. Here is some of our most recent work and I would love some feedback/ tips and any comments on our work.

on.fb.me/X7B04w - Benares Indian Restaurant | New York

Let me know what you guys think!

Here are some more of our tours:

www.acmbphotography.com/virtual-tours/
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 31 Jan 2013 at 17:27 GMT
I have never been a big fan of the mirror ball Nadir patch. Your panos look very nice until you tilt down and see an oversized mirror ball. The effect distracts from your panorama. With all the effort you have put into creating and publishing your panoramas, you should learn how to properly patch the Nadir. You obviously have good photography and stitching skills. Consider it the icing on the cake. I personally would rather see you limit the downward tilt instead. Otherwise they all look very nice. Thanks for sharing.
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Octavias

Posts: 33
Location: Brooklyn, United States
Registered: 31 Jan 2013
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 31 Jan 2013 at 23:54 GMT
Thank you for the feedback,

I agree with you completely. I have a couple of tutorial i have been looking at but i have to admin its harder than it looks. I feel bad putting that mirror ball there as well, but it works for now, i mean i couple cut the panorama but then it will loose that 360 feel to it so i REALLY wanna master the Nadir patch. i use this to learn, would you recommend anything better?
www.rosaurophotography.com/html/technical3.html


Thanks again for the advice!

-Max
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burake

Posts: 336
Location: Antalya, Turkey
Registered: 7 Jun 2012
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 14 Feb 2013 at 6:36 GMT
Max,
The nadir issue can be solved more easily by using the viewpoint correction method of PTGUI ( I assume you are using PTGUI for stitching, if not I'd highly recommend the pro version)....Have a look at:
www.ptgui.com/examples/vptutorial.html
and
www.johnhpanos.com/ptgvpt.htm
You can use markers on the ground to find control points between the nadir shot and the surrounding shots...The markers can then be easily edited in PS...In the lighting conditions that you have it won't be easy to get shutter speeds high enough to get a sharp hand held nadir shot...But you can shoot the nadir also from an "off-the-NPP" angle with your camera on the tripod...Feel free to ask, if you have further questions...
Regards
Burak
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Octavias

Posts: 33
Location: Brooklyn, United States
Registered: 31 Jan 2013
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 21 Feb 2013 at 18:15 GMT
Wow, Thanks! I shall read those tutorials and make a better one and make sure to show you guys the product!
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Octavias

Posts: 33
Location: Brooklyn, United States
Registered: 31 Jan 2013
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 9 Mar 2013 at 18:23 GMT
Hey guys Thanks for the feed back!

I have upped my game and used a different panoramic head and other devices and i got a perfect stitch! And also a new Nadir technique, check it out:

acmbphotography.com/Octavias/Brighton%20Beach%20V...

-Max
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John Houghton

Posts: 3934
Location: Hitchin, United Kingdom
Registered: 17 Jan 2005
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 10 Mar 2013 at 14:52 GMT

Octavias said:

i got a perfect stitch! And also a new Nadir technique, check it out:

acmbphotography.com/Octavias/Brighton%20Beach%20V...

-Max

This is ok and the patched nadir is certainly preferable to a mirror ball. However, your new technique obviously involves cloning the tripod away. Most people won't notice or look for the repeated areas as I did, but I suggest that you also learn how to stitch in a nadir image using viewpoint correction. It's not difficult, and more satisfying.

John
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 10 Mar 2013 at 22:44 GMT
You are definately going in the right direction.

I would rather see cloning than a mirror ball.

The more panoramas you look at the quicker you can spot a clone job. The casual observer would most likely not notice.

The next step is to take a picture straight down (or offset at an agle) and stitch that in. Your sample pano would be one of the easiest to stitch in a Nadir shot.

Keep going. Each one is getting better.
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burake

Posts: 336
Location: Antalya, Turkey
Registered: 7 Jun 2012
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 11 Mar 2013 at 21:47 GMT
Good job...I didn't get that there was cloning here until I read John's comment and looked again carefully...You may -and probably will- come in shooting situations where cloning won't be easy/and sometimes impossible to get the nadir area correct...Tiled floors, carpets with patterns on them, wooden surfaces with natural patterns of the wood...Once you learn taking an extra shot for nadir and stitching it together with the rest you'll have the best solution for teh most challenging shooting situations...And as John says it is not difficult...
Regards
Burak
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Octavias

Posts: 33
Location: Brooklyn, United States
Registered: 31 Jan 2013
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 12 Mar 2013 at 14:12 GMT
Hey guys,

Thanks for the great feedback. I have been shooting on ISO 100 pretty much all the time to get the best quality for my panoramas and on about f/16. So most of the time its hard to get a good ratio between the two to get a good shutter speed over 1/80 to shoot handheld. I was thinking on my next panorama to up the ISO a bit, to lets say like 600 or something, is that what you guys do? This is of course only applicable to my Restaurant tours and in door work, outdoor i have no problem getting a fast enough shutter to work the magic!

p.s. John! You are the man, i have found a tutorial by you, how to mask the Nadir in PT-Qui so i have been studying that smile
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JdT

Posts: 64
Location: United States
Registered: 6 Jul 2012
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 12 Mar 2013 at 15:56 GMT
Your sharpest aperture likely isn't f/16. I'd consider f/11 or f/8.
I try to avoid going over 400 ISO but that's my personal tolerance for noise for my setup.
And why shoot handheld?
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 12 Mar 2013 at 18:08 GMT
F16 is not the best choice.

You need to find the combination of focus setting and f stop that will yield the longest depth of field.

Have a look at the following two web pages. They show what happens when you play with the focus and f stop.
www.dlsphoto.net/Tutorials/LensSharpnessTest/15mm...
www.dlsphoto.net/Tutorials/LensSharpnessTest/15mm...

Once you determine the combination of focus and f stop, you will always use them for every panorama you shoot.

The ISO setting depends on the camera. With my NEX-7 I rarely go over 800. I will shoot ISO 6400 all day long with my D800. If I use my D3s I have no issues shooting 12,800 ISO. Remember that we are not creating pictures that will be examined under a microscope when blown up to building size. We are creating images that will have a lot of the detail stripped out when prepared for internet publication.

Why shoot hand held? If all you shoot is real estate where there is plenty of room to work, then hand held probably is not needed. If you are climbing El Capitan and want to shoot a pano, there is no place to put your tripod. 100% of my monopod panoramas include 1 or 2 hand held Nadir patch shots. If you never practice shooting in a difficult situation, when you encounter a difficult scene that you want to shoot, you will not be able to. It is called pushing yourself. The Louvre in Paris comes to mind. You are not allowed to carry any kind of camera support. All pictures (including panoramas) must be hand held. www.dlsphoto.net/Europe2009/Paris/Louvre/Stairway...
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JdT

Posts: 64
Location: United States
Registered: 6 Jul 2012
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 13 Mar 2013 at 16:27 GMT
I'd ideally like to have the option to print my equis 4ftx2ft (sometimes larger) as well as other projections in large sizes... something I intend to start doing often. Lower iso is definitely beneficial for this. If you only intend to use your images with "detail stripped out when prepared for internet publication" this will be much less of an issue. Image quality that gives you options for other forms of output can't be a bad thing. With that said, sometimes high iso is the only option and cameras do have amazing high ISO performance compared to what they used to.

Clearly there are times when handheld is the only option but the OP doesn't seem to be asking about those situations (maybe I misunderstood)? If there is time, space, and a tripod available, why shoot hand held? Admittedly there are many great works created without a tripod, however, my question is for the OP's situation.
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DennisS

Posts: 1787
Location: Los Anglels, United States
Registered: 1 Sep 2007
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 13 Mar 2013 at 17:19 GMT
...my question is for the OP's situation.
The more panoramas you shoot the more difficult situations you will encounter. You will want to capture the pano in a place that does not lend itself to sliding the tripod over in order to take the Nadir patch shot. You can choose to pick another location or do what it takes to get the Nadir patch shot. In my case I would go for the difficult Nadir patch shot.

This pano was shot entirely hand held, including the Nadir shot. www.dlsphoto.net/Europe2009/Paris/Maria_A_Cell/Pa... I had to push the ISO of my poor little D300 to the extreme. I really wanted a pano shot at a very specific location in that very poorly lit room. Hand held and high ISO was requried. It was either put up with noise and stitching errors or not get the shot. I chose to get the shot. I admit the result is not stellar, but I have the memory documented.

Learning to shoot a hand held Nadir shot is required if you want to capture a difficult panorama.
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JdT

Posts: 64
Location: United States
Registered: 6 Jul 2012
Re: Benares Indian Cuisine | New York Virtual tour!
Posted: 13 Mar 2013 at 18:27 GMT
updated: 13 Mar 2013 at 18:30 GMT
Is the OP trying to document a memory with a difficult nadir patch or produce a commercial product that a business will pay for? I see I may be assuming too much. When I saw the title and description I assumed he was going for commercial vs fun/hobby.

It's great to have as many tools as possible in your bag of tricks but choosing the best tool for the job is the point I'm getting at. Also, there are plenty of tricks other than handholding for a difficult nadir... just depends on your situation and end goal. Here is one interesting choice: www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10200621937008348....146240618753391&type=1&theater
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